Ways to Repair a Leaky Garden Hose Yourself

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Leaks in your garden hose can be an awful nuisance and a terrible waste of water. Most people, when faced with a leaking garden hose, immediately throw it out and buy a new one. But we're here to tell you that isn't necessary. Most leaks can be fixed quite inexpensively and quickly.

Fixing a Hole in the Hose

Maybe you ran it over with your lawnmower or perhaps the split is the result of age or another accident. However it happened, repairing the hose is easy. Forget about fixing it with rubber cement, tape, or a tire repair kit. These methods are seldom entirely efficient and can get messy.

Instead, get yourself a hose repair kit from your local hardware or home improvement store. The kit comes with two hose clamps and a connector. Cut out the damaged section of the hose using garden shears. Slip one of the round clamps onto one of the ends and insert the connector into the hose. If necessary, use some dish soap as a lubricant. Tighten the clamp over the connector with a screwdriver. Then do the same with the other section of hose. If the connection leaks, either one of the clamps is not sufficiently tightened, or the connector isn't far enough inside the hose.

Fixing a Leaky Connection

If your leak is where one hose meets another or where the hose is attached to the faucet, and you have tried tightening the connection to no avail, you probably have a worn out gasket. The gasket is the flat round rubber piece inside the hose connector that creates a waterproof seal. When they get dried out and cracked, or when they go missing, you get a leak. Instead of replacing it with another flat gasket, we suggest using an O-ring of the same size, as these provide a far better seal.

A Leak at the Faucet

There are two forms of leaks that can occur at the faucet, also known as the hose bib. If water drips continuously from the tap, even when the faucet is closed, the washer inside the mechanism has to be replaced. Start by turning the water supply off and open the tap to drain water from inside the pipes. Behind the faucet handle, you'll see the hexagonal packing nut. Holding the valve body in place with channel locks or locking pliers, unscrew the packing nut with a wrench.

Pull the valve stem out and remove the old washer held in by a screw. Make sure to buy a replacement washer of the same size and install it on the valve stem. Return the bib in its place and tighten the packing nut.

The second kind of leak that can occur at the faucet is when water seeps out behind the handle when the tap is off. Usually the result of the packing nut not being tight enough in the valve body. If the leak persists after tightening it, remove the valve assembly and wrap Teflon tape around the threads.

For all of your plumbing repairs, inside or outside of your home, you can count on the experts at grave2-film.ru in Temecula & Houston, TX. Call us today at to book an appointment with one of our friendly professionals.